Writing: Three Ways to Avoid Bunny-trailing

 

Smith & Sons

Hey all!

To me, something that can often detract from a book is when the story or characters bunny-trail. It is greatly frustrating to me when writers do this, they take space up in a book with excess characters or plot lines and waste the possibilities and potential that is at their fingertips. So here are 3 tips on how to avoid the ever frustrating bunny-trail.

 


  • #1. If something doesn’t add to your main story goal but rather is a personal pet idea be prepared to crush it mercilessly. It’s that scene that you have played out in your head 236 times and is really cool but doesn’t really fit in anywhere. Most of the time it’s not a good plan to structure your entire story around one little scene that has no purpose beyond making you, the author, happy. If you can fit these beloved scenes into the story without them detracting from the flow of it, then go ahead and enjoy yourself, but not at the expense of your story’s purpose. 

 

  • #2. Avoid characters that are unnecessary. The more often you bring in characters who serve little to no purpose at all the more often you will injure your story and distract your readers from the overall goal. Often these characters end up flat, annoying, or plain weird! 

 

  • #3. And last but not least, have characters and plot threads serve dual purposes. Often time the best way to a good story that doesn’t bunny-trail is by taking a smaller amount of people and plot threads and using them for multiple things. Rather than have many characters who serve one single story purpose and end up lacking the time to develop the personality of each and every one, make your characters influential and important in multiple ways and gain time to showcase their individual personalities. Instead of having one incident serve a single purpose in the plot have it serve three. Your plot and people will be stronger, more realistic, and you will avoid the annoying bunny-trail. 

 

Alrighty, guys, that’s it for today. I hope these tips are helpful in your present and future writing endeavors! Comment below with your thoughts-do you agree with these tips? 

Happy writing, y’all! 

The Importance of Picking Apart your Books

Everything we see, hear, or read is a tiny seed planted in our hearts and minds. A seed that we have to decide what to do with. Whether to water it and let it thrive, or to starve it! To yank it up from its roots, and burn the toxic ideology that is disagreeable to our beliefs. 

The difficulty is, sometimes you can’t recognize the seeds. Ideas and beliefs can be so easily slipped into books. Woven into the literature so seamlessly you don’t always realize they are there. So, when reading, it is import to digest as you go.

For example: with Fantasy sometimes it’s easy to pass something off as part of the story-world that really isn’t good. Since it’s Fantasy, it’s easy to say, “Hey, it’s how the world works. So maybe in the real world it’s evil to touch that dark, pyramid-shaped object and chant the special words to glean magical powers, but here? Eh, I’ll let it pass. After all, the main girl is using her powers to save the group who represent Christendom.”

So, when reading a book of any genre, it’s important to look closely. If something sounds or feels a bit funny, take a closer look. And hey, if it’s a bit off base, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the book is completely off-limits. But when you are aware of the snake in the grass you can avoid being bitten.

Don’t just accept everything you read, pick it apart. And even beyond identifying the things that don’t match up with your beliefs, picking a book apart can be a great idea. As a writer and reader the more you dissect a story the more you understand the art of literature, the more you understand the way to work your own theology and beliefs into the stories you create. 

The heart is easily swayed and the mind can be quickly fooled, and both impact how you see the world. So don’t accept all you see or hear. Dissect, prod, pick apart, and whatever you find you’ll be glad you did!