Book Launch-Deliver

Hey guys! I am here today to share about Deliver the final installment in the Blades of Acktar series! –Synopsis below.


34791322 Can something broken ever heal?

Martyn is broken. After torturing his best friend, he doesn’t belong anywhere in Acktar. No matter how far he runs, he can’t lose his guilt.

Leith is broken. While healing from the torture he received at Nalgar Castle, he struggles to find his new role. But can a Blade ever run from his past?

The country is broken. Bitterness divides town against town, neighbor against neighbor. What will it take to deliver Acktar from itself?

They face their hardest battle yet.
Peace.


 

Although the only book I have read out of TBoA series is, DareI look forward to one day reading the rest! After all, who isn’t a fan of a super-assassin with a sad back-story? 

Anyways, Deliver, will be released on April 25! Mark it on your calendars, or pre-order on Amazon and make sure to catch up on the rest of the series!

For more info on the rest of the series you can go to Tricia’s Goodreads page, or her website! Have a great weekend, everyone, good reading! 

 

Book Review: Sea of Crystal, Sea of Glass

Sea of Crystal, Sea of GlassWhen faced with the impossible and the unthinkable, choose the impossible.

All that fifteen-year-old Einur Landman has left in the world are his flock of sheep and his beloved little sister. His entire life’s purpose is to keep Lody safe from the evil ruling class. But he never expected that it would be his own name that was drawn for the child sacrifice. Leaving Lody with his promise to return, Einur escapes into the wild where he meets a stranger with a plan to bring down the Illyrië. Forced to choose between the unthinkable – Lody’s probable death – and the seemingly impossible, Einur takes the latter.

In his quest from his mountain village, through countless dangers, to the sea itself, everything Einur believes will be tested. For Lody’s sake, can he make a final crucial choice and stand firm to the end?


 

Overall Impression

Benita is a self-professed lover of Fantasy, especially Tolkien. Something clear in SOCSOG to an occasional fault, more on this in Plot

While I know several people on Goodreads who thoroughly enjoyed this book, for me it was dry. I wasn’t compelled to finish it.

If you love anything fantasy I would recommend this book to you. If you are hesitant towards fantasy already, this is probably not for you. 

Appropriate for older-readers and some families. I would, however, advise discretion towards parents reading to their little children. This book includes child-sacrifice and some intense/scary scenes. 

 

Characters

To be honest, I wasn’t particularly attached to any of the characters in this book. In a lot of ways the character development was inconsistent and unrealistic. As well as to many extraneous characters being brought in.

Einur, to me, was rather annoying. His thought processes didn’t make sense and he had a rather cynical/snarky feeling to him overall. 

Lody was sweet, I liked her. In fact she was probably my favorite. 

 

 

Plot

As I said before, Benita is a lover of Tolkien-who isn’t, am I right? 🙂 But this could go too far: there was a feeling throughout the entire book that Benita was grasping to make it similar to the works of Tolkien, many names such as, Alarandil, that were obviously modeled after LoTR, and one part where there was a sentence* practically taken out of Fellowship of the Ring.

*”A fell voice-there is a fell voice on the wind. As though someone were cooking up a sorcery.”-Einur 

Here is what I would say about that…it’s not bad to model your books after books you love, the key part is to do it in moderation. When writers work so hard to make their books Tolkien-ish, or similar to the works of C.S. Lewis etc. they get in their own way. The only way you are going to be a truly successful and original author is if it is original! 

Another thing that was hard about this book was that it was hard to follow. The characters, plot, flow all of it! There was much that was never fully explained (All the stuff with Berwyn and Eldrast, like, what the heck was going on there?!?) and much that was very confusing. Not a good mix. I believe had Benita dropped some more unnecessary bunny trails and stayed within the essential parts of her story it would have been clearer.  

One thing I liked very much was the essential idea behind the plot. It was good, quite stereotypical fantasy, but who cares! I like all the cliché that can come along with fantasy! I think that in time, if Benita adjusts her approach to writing in some ways, she could be a very good storyteller! Part of it is just experience. 

To Benita I would say, keep working and persevering! Try not to write the best Tolkien-ish book you can and instead try to write the best book you can.

 

Also, may I just say, beautiful cover! 

Warnings:

Language/Profanity: Characters take a fake god’s name in vain-didn’t really bother me. 

Violence/Frightening Scenes/Gore: As there is child sacrifice in this there is going to be some creepy scenes. The Illyrie’s practices are creepy, there is a creepy guy who hypnotized a main character, several scenes where either they were dreams or real, not sure it was hard to tell. A big mist monster is fought. A very little bit of battle, not intense in the least. On the conservative side I would rate this 13+. 

Sex/Nudity: None

 


I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review 

The Importance of Picking Apart your Books

Everything we see, hear, or read is a tiny seed planted in our hearts and minds. A seed that we have to decide what to do with. Whether to water it and let it thrive, or to starve it! To yank it up from its roots, and burn the toxic ideology that is disagreeable to our beliefs. 

The difficulty is, sometimes you can’t recognize the seeds. Ideas and beliefs can be so easily slipped into books. Woven into the literature so seamlessly you don’t always realize they are there. So, when reading, it is import to digest as you go.

For example: with Fantasy sometimes it’s easy to pass something off as part of the story-world that really isn’t good. Since it’s Fantasy, it’s easy to say, “Hey, it’s how the world works. So maybe in the real world it’s evil to touch that dark, pyramid-shaped object and chant the special words to glean magical powers, but here? Eh, I’ll let it pass. After all, the main girl is using her powers to save the group who represent Christendom.”

So, when reading a book of any genre, it’s important to look closely. If something sounds or feels a bit funny, take a closer look. And hey, if it’s a bit off base, it doesn’t necessarily mean that the book is completely off-limits. But when you are aware of the snake in the grass you can avoid being bitten.

Don’t just accept everything you read, pick it apart. And even beyond identifying the things that don’t match up with your beliefs, picking a book apart can be a great idea. As a writer and reader the more you dissect a story the more you understand the art of literature, the more you understand the way to work your own theology and beliefs into the stories you create. 

The heart is easily swayed and the mind can be quickly fooled, and both impact how you see the world. So don’t accept all you see or hear. Dissect, prod, pick apart, and whatever you find you’ll be glad you did! 

 

Book Review: Truth by Molly Evangeline

12121575Trapped in a village no one is allowed to leave, Makilien yearns for the answers to her questions about life and the world outside the village walls. Yet no one but her closest friend seems to understand or share her desire. Despite her family’s fears and warnings of the consequences, she is determined to find answers.

The unexpected arrival of a stranger, and the knowledge he possesses, drives Makilien to drastic action. Confronted with a world she knows nothing about, she must choose carefully who to trust as both good and evil lurk in all places. As a battle looms, one in which will be determined the fate of all, she must decide whether to believe in the One who is truth or fall prey to the lies of the enemy.


 

Overall Impression

Truth is one of my all-time favorite fantasy reads. It is, actually,the book that first inspired me towards writing. It was so different from anything I had ever read before. Entering the world of Dolennar was, and still is a treat.

Truth is exactly what I look for in Christian Fantasy. A good, magic free story, deep and lovable characters, and a wonderfully constructed world. This book’s theme is a mix of a coming-of-age story and an epic quest for truth. Truth is a fun read for single readers and families both.

Characters

The large cast of characters in Truth are done wonderfully.

Makilien, the main character, is a nice mix of femininity  and warrior. She does what needs to be done without becoming a callused shell of a female. She is sweet and vulnerable, but very skilled. Makilien is a great role model. She wants to do the right thing and tries hard to do it. She, though somewhat rebellious in the beginning of the book, is not the sarcastic, hard-as-nails female character we have come to expect nowadays.

The supporting characters in this book are done very nicely as well. Each one is different from the next. Sometimes large casts of characters can detract from a book’s story. Either they divert too much attention from the main characters, or the large number background makes it impossible to give each an individual personality. This is not the case in Truth. The background characters have definable personalities and add flavor to the story rather than detracting from the book.

The baddies in this book are pretty good.And although they can be a slight bit overdone, overall they are good story catalysts.

Plot

The plot of Truth is an epic journey. The story-line, overall, is unique and exciting.And though there are some clichés, I didn’t mind them.

The story enters upon Makilien at the end of her patience with her stagnant village. A stranger arrives in Reylaun, her village, and  a series of event transpires that causes Makilien to leave her village. After that she visits several countries and makes many new friends.

Truth is a fascinating story, with characters you love to root for.

Warnings: 

Language/Profanity: None.

Violence/Gore/Frightening Scenes: This book has some frightening creatures and scenes. Goblins and orc-like creatures called Shaikes. There is some torture, nothing horrible, but for younger readers it may not be advisable. This book has several skirmishes and battles in this book and thus there is the stuff you might expect from that. The descriptions of battle, war, and death are apt while still being tactful. A main character is stabbed and nearly dies. This book is probably best for children 10-12 (depending on the child and parents preferences) on up.

Sex/Nudity: None.