Book Review: Sea of Crystal, Sea of Glass

Sea of Crystal, Sea of GlassWhen faced with the impossible and the unthinkable, choose the impossible.

All that fifteen-year-old Einur Landman has left in the world are his flock of sheep and his beloved little sister. His entire life’s purpose is to keep Lody safe from the evil ruling class. But he never expected that it would be his own name that was drawn for the child sacrifice. Leaving Lody with his promise to return, Einur escapes into the wild where he meets a stranger with a plan to bring down the Illyrië. Forced to choose between the unthinkable – Lody’s probable death – and the seemingly impossible, Einur takes the latter.

In his quest from his mountain village, through countless dangers, to the sea itself, everything Einur believes will be tested. For Lody’s sake, can he make a final crucial choice and stand firm to the end?


 

Overall Impression

Benita is a self-professed lover of Fantasy, especially Tolkien. Something clear in SOCSOG to an occasional fault, more on this in Plot

While I know several people on Goodreads who thoroughly enjoyed this book, for me it was dry. I wasn’t compelled to finish it.

If you love anything fantasy I would recommend this book to you. If you are hesitant towards fantasy already, this is probably not for you. 

Appropriate for older-readers and some families. I would, however, advise discretion towards parents reading to their little children. This book includes child-sacrifice and some intense/scary scenes. 

 

Characters

To be honest, I wasn’t particularly attached to any of the characters in this book. In a lot of ways the character development was inconsistent and unrealistic. As well as to many extraneous characters being brought in.

Einur, to me, was rather annoying. His thought processes didn’t make sense and he had a rather cynical/snarky feeling to him overall. 

Lody was sweet, I liked her. In fact she was probably my favorite. 

 

 

Plot

As I said before, Benita is a lover of Tolkien-who isn’t, am I right? 🙂 But this could go too far: there was a feeling throughout the entire book that Benita was grasping to make it similar to the works of Tolkien, many names such as, Alarandil, that were obviously modeled after LoTR, and one part where there was a sentence* practically taken out of Fellowship of the Ring.

*”A fell voice-there is a fell voice on the wind. As though someone were cooking up a sorcery.”-Einur 

Here is what I would say about that…it’s not bad to model your books after books you love, the key part is to do it in moderation. When writers work so hard to make their books Tolkien-ish, or similar to the works of C.S. Lewis etc. they get in their own way. The only way you are going to be a truly successful and original author is if it is original! 

Another thing that was hard about this book was that it was hard to follow. The characters, plot, flow all of it! There was much that was never fully explained (All the stuff with Berwyn and Eldrast, like, what the heck was going on there?!?) and much that was very confusing. Not a good mix. I believe had Benita dropped some more unnecessary bunny trails and stayed within the essential parts of her story it would have been clearer.  

One thing I liked very much was the essential idea behind the plot. It was good, quite stereotypical fantasy, but who cares! I like all the cliché that can come along with fantasy! I think that in time, if Benita adjusts her approach to writing in some ways, she could be a very good storyteller! Part of it is just experience. 

To Benita I would say, keep working and persevering! Try not to write the best Tolkien-ish book you can and instead try to write the best book you can.

 

Also, may I just say, beautiful cover! 

Warnings:

Language/Profanity: Characters take a fake god’s name in vain-didn’t really bother me. 

Violence/Frightening Scenes/Gore: As there is child sacrifice in this there is going to be some creepy scenes. The Illyrie’s practices are creepy, there is a creepy guy who hypnotized a main character, several scenes where either they were dreams or real, not sure it was hard to tell. A big mist monster is fought. A very little bit of battle, not intense in the least. On the conservative side I would rate this 13+. 

Sex/Nudity: None

 


I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review 

Book Review: The Princess Adelina

4918709From eighth-century Germany comes the stirring tale of Princess Adelina, a virtuous young woman determined to fulfill God’s call on her life. The daughter of an Iona missionary to the German people, Adelina’s world is turned upside-down when a young pagan ruler, Hedan of Thurginia, falls in love with her and takes her as his bride. As a wedding gift, Hedan promises Adelina that he will allow Christians within Thuringia to worship and evangelize freely, spreading the Gospel among his people. But Hedan’s mother, Geila, hates both Adelina and Christianity, stopping at nothing to subvert her daughter-in-law and stamp out the fledgling German church. Based on a true story, this Esther-like tale recounts the deeds of courageous Adelina as she endures persecution, slander, exile, and the impending destruction of her people. Through it all, will Adelina remain faithful to her Heavenly King? Or will she fall away and leave the Culdee church to its fate? Find out in The Princess Adelina.


 

Overall Impression

This book has, since the first time I read it, been one of my favorites. The culture is amazing, the characters wonderful and the story itself? The story is a powerful tale of faith, love, and courage. And the most amazing part about it is that it really happened. This story truly shows the power of God’s hand and the beauty of his plan. I would recommend this to everyone. 

 

Characters

Adelina is truly a heroine. She is one of my favorite characters of all time. In this sweet maiden you find a heart true to the Lord. She is kind, godly, and faithful to her husband even when it’s not easy. This is one of my favorite things about her. Hedan, for a time, is TERRIBLE. But even when another man who is kind and loving comes into Adelina’s life she remains true to her husband. 

Hedan. For quite awhile this man is very angering. He only “loves” Adelina for her beauty, and is quick to believe false testimony against her.He is an evil man. That’s just the truth. But wait it out, eventually, he becomes a wonderful man. He is a great character. 

Gelia, ugh! The woman is shiver-worthy! She is the perfect antagonist! So much evil in one woman. I hate her through and through. 

Five stars for the background characters! I adore Regiswald, Pillung and the others! 

 

Plot

This story is very much like the story of Esther. A Christian girl marries a heathen to protect her people. Not only does she saves them, but ultimately, she saves many more people. 

Be prepared for somewhat difficult writing, it is filled with “thee” and “thou” and many complicated names. This, however, doesn’t detract from the story. Rather it adds to the character and culture of the book. 

I love the rise and fall of this book. It begins a bit slowly, but it quickly gains momentum. It’s one I can’t stop reading. I love the climax and the ending. This book is gold

 

Warnings:

Language/Profanity: None

Violence/Gore/Frightening Scenes: There is some violence in this book and (if I remember right) some mild gore. Nothing horrible, most readers should be fine. There are some frightening scenes, at one point a woman is going to be sacrificed to Woden. She, however, is saved and unharmed. A woman is beaten, this is non-descriptive. A man is somewhat crushed by a tree. There is a battle. A character is threatened with going through fire trials. (Overall, readers 9-10 on up should be fine with this.) 

Sex/Nudity: A woman has her chest bared when she is about to be sacrificed. Nothing descriptive.